What is ABA?

Applied Behavior Analysis

ABA is Applied Behavior Analysis, the study of human and animal behavior. ABA focuses on improving socially significant behaviors. ABA has a large research base and its methods have been proven to improve positive behaviors for its clients. ABA has been recognized as the most effective treatment for autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disorders.  

A for Applied

“Applied” means practice, rather than research or philosophy. When we take the research principles that have been proven to work and use those strategies to help our clients improve their lives, we are applying those principles and strategies in meaningful ways.

B for Behavior

Behavior in ABA stands for anything that a living organism, human or animal, does that can be observed by others.  So often we think of behavior and associate negative behaviors with that term.  When we say “behavior” in ABA, we can be discussing negative or difficult behaviors, like tantrums, yelling, swearing, stealing, but we can also be focusing on positive behaviors, like sharing, talking, waving good-bye, making a purchase.  Each of these are things an outsider can observe happening.  If we can see it, then we can take data on it. 

It may seem odd to use the word “behavior” when talking about learning to talk, play, and live as a complex social animal, but to a behavior analyst all these can be taught, as long as there are intact brain functions to learn and practice the skills. 

A for Analysis

Analysis means that we are a science, we use data to make our decisions, and we do this continually as we work with you.  When we work with your child we will take data, review the data for trends (increases, decreases, stability, or instability), and make decisions that are based on the data we observe. Most BCBAs love data.  We love looking at graphs and making data-based decisions that will help your child to learn more.

Put it all together and what you have is ABA.  ABA is about teaching our clients to learn new skills, replace behaviors of concern with more socially appropriate behaviors, and focusing on improving and increasing behaviors that will be meaningful to the client and society.

Why does my child need ABA?

Most typically developing children learn without our intervention–the world around them provides the right conditions to learn language, play, and social skills. Children learn a lot from their natural environment. Children with autism may learn less easily from the natural environment. While they have the potential to learn, depending on the child and their specific individual needs, it might take a more structured environment or a blend of structure and natural environment, for learning to occur, an environment where conditions are optimized for acquiring the same skills that typical children learn “naturally.” ABA is all about how to set up the environment to enable our kids to learn.

ABA is endorsed by U.S. Surgeon General and CDC

ABA has been endorsed by a number of state and federal agencies, including the U.S. Surgeon General and Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as an effective therapy for children and adults with autism spectrum disorder.

United States Surgeon General David Satcher, MD, PhD, has endorsed intensive behavioral intervention for individuals with autism. Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General states, “Thirty years of research demonstrated the efficacy of applied behavioral methods in reducing inappropriate behavior and in increasing communication, learning, and appropriate social behavior.”

The report is available on the Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General and also ordered by 1-877-9MHealth, or by writing to Mental Health, Pueblo, CO 81009.

Additional Organizations that Endorse ABA

The following organizations endorse ABA as a scientifically proven approach for treating children with autism and related disorders:

If you would like to learn more about ABA, here are some helpful resources:

Autism Speaks- Applied Behavior Analysis

BACB- PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR ASD

If you want to learn more about GBC aba and our ABA services, please to go our website and fill out our interest form or email us at info@gbcaba.com.

Top 5 Outdoor Activities for Children with Autism

Here are the top 5 outdoor activities you can do with your whole family before summer ends with some tips on how to help your child with Autism be successful and have fun!

#5 Theme Parks

While theme parks are expensive, loud, and often over-crowded this time of year, an instant cocktail for sensory overload, there are ways your child with Autism can enjoy and have fun, too!  Call your local theme park or look on their website to see if they offer disability waivers, passes, or other accommodations.  Many theme parks (e.g. @Disneyland, @WaltDisneyWorld, @SixFlags) now are more accessible by offering accommodations like low wait times, front of the line passes, quiet hours, quiet rooms, diet or allergy-friendly menus, or allowing strollers to be used like wheelchairs.  While you do not need to tell the park your child’s specific disability, this would be a violation of Americans with Disabilities Act (#ADA), you might need a doctor’s note stating they require accommodations.  Do your homework before arriving at the park, so you are prepared.

When at the park watch your child and be sensitive to their needs.  Be prepared with favorite snacks, calming or soothing items (favorite blankets, toys, fidgets), noise cancelling head phones, iPad or tablets, and other favorite activities they can use while waiting in lines. When your child seems, overwhelmed, find a corner or quiet, less crowded area to allow them to recompose themselves, then return to the fun.

#4 Backyard Fun

Summer is a great time to break out the pop-up pools, sprinklers, water tables and sand tables.  All those kinetic sand, bubbles, goo and slime kits that your child got throughout the year are great to play with outdoors.  Less mess for you to clean up and fun for them! If you have room, you can set up a trampoline, swings, or hammocks.

If you have a runner/wanderer, keep a close eye on your child, stay within an arm’s reach, or try to schedule outdoor fun when your #ABA behavior technician or therapist is with you. This is a great time to practice those safety instructions: wait, come here, stop, stay in the boundaries.  If you don’t have a fence, set up cones or barriers for your child to know how far they can travel before they need to ask permission to leave the area.

#3 Splash Pads or Spray Parks

There are often some great local splash pads that are free or inexpensive to enjoy! You can search your county for local splash pads and spray parks.  Most are open through Memorial Day weekend. Your kids can get soaked by standing under the water towers, spray cannons, or buckets.  Come prepared with towels, swimsuits, sunscreen, and water shoes.  Most will allow you to bring outside toys for water play. water at most splash pads and spray parks are usually only 1-2 ft. deep. Splash around, cool off and enjoy the sun!

#2 Playgrounds

Local parks and playgrounds are great this time of year! Especially when you are needing to get out of the house, but don’t want to spend a lot of money. While there, you can practice the safety skills mentioned above, communication or social skills goals your child may have.  Your children can get their energy out, be social and have fun.

#1 Pools:

This is my favorite, both as an Autism mom and therapist!  Both private and public pools are a wonderful way to enjoy the summer sun, stay cool and have fun! It is so easy to spend hours in the pool! It seems like most children and adults with autism love the water.

While we love to watch our children having fun, we also have to be extra cautious around water.  Drowning is the leading cause of death for kids with ASD, this may be due to the tendency for children with autism to wander off and when they wander, they are drawn to water.  Check out these water safety tips to be prepared.  Ask your local pool if they offer private swim lessons or group lessons for children with special needs.  Many special recreation associations also offer swimming lessons.  Do your research, be prepared, but most of all have fun!

Last Days of Summer

Before you pack your kids to get on the bus for the first day of school this fall, take advantage of some of these ideas with the last few days of summer!

Tips to Help Kids with Autism Transition Back to School

 

Fall is approaching quickly!  The air is getting cooler, the sun is setting earlier and your local supermarket is selling out of school supplies fast!

Time to prepare your child for the first day of school! What do you need to do?

Covering The Basics

Register with your local school, pay the fees, buy some fall clothes (those jeans from last year are probably ankle cut by now), visit the doctor for the health physical, buy school supplies, and stack up on lunch and snack items.

What do you need to do to prepare your child?

Some of these may be less obvious, but will definitely help your child transition through this change.

8 Easy to Follow Priming Strategies    

Priming is something most of us do naturally, without even knowing we are doing it. Priming is an antecedent-based strategy, meaning a strategy we can use BEFORE the behavior typically occurs, with hopes that it will decrease the likelihood the behavior will happen.  That was a mouthful.  Basically, antecedent strategies, like priming, are things you can do every day to help your child be more successful.  They won’t always work to decrease the behavior, but they might, plus they are just good things to do.

Priming, specifically, is a warning given in advance notifying your child of an upcoming event or change in the environment. There are many ways we can prime our children.  Here are some of the ways you can prime your child about the 1st day of school:

  • Visual schedules (make a visual schedule showing your child the routine for getting ready for school or a weekly calendar labeling when school starts)
  • Visuals (try using real photos of your child’s school, teacher, bus, classroom if you can. If you don’t have real photos available, you can use clipart.)
  • Countdowns (here is a sample Back to School Countdown Calendar)
  • Timers (set a timer to transition from a preferred activity to a less preferred activity, like getting on the bus)
  • Schedules of Reinforcement (set up a preferred item or activity your child can earn when they get on the bus or come home from school the first week)
  • First Then Boards (use a first then visual “First School, Then Home or Then Park)
  • Vocal prompts (e.g. “One more week till we go back to school”)
  • Social stories (it is best to make your child a personal social story with pictures and thoughts that they would understand, check out how to make a social story here.)

Sleep Schedules

If your family is like mine, we stay up later and sleep in during the summer.  This makes transitioning to fall schedules even harder.  Start slowly by setting alarms earlier gradually, going to bed earlier a few minutes each night. If you don’t already have one, develop a night time routine that is consistent.  Children with autism like routines and having a predictable one will help reduce anxiety or behaviors that can occur when trying to put children to bed. Making these changes will help your child get back onto a school sleep schedule.

For children that struggle with falling asleep or maintaining sleep, try no electronics an hour before, essential oils diffused (we like lavender), play soft music, dim lighting, or try a back or foot massage (use lotion or oils). Make your child’s bedroom conducive to sleep—dark, cool, quiet.  Children need 8-12 hours of sleep per day. It is very common for children and adults with autism to have difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep through the night. If your child is struggling with sleep, speak to their pediatrician.  Some children benefit from over-the-counter melatonin (available in gummy, chewable, or pill forms) or other medications designed to aid sleep.

School Visits

Schedule a school visit to help prepare your child for the first day of school. Attend any scheduled meet and greets at your child’s school.  If your school doesn’t have a meet and greet scheduled, you can set up a time to meet the teacher or tour the school before school begins. Contact the office or special education coordinator to schedule these visits.  When you are there, be sure to take photos for your social stories or visuals.  You can usually get photos of teachers off the school website.

From You to Your Child’s Teacher

Coordinate with the special education case manager for your child the first IEP meeting of the year.  You can meet formally or informally to discuss any changes (e.g. medications, new skills, lost skills) before school starts or within the first 30 days of school.

Teachers are supposed to read the IEP accommodations and goals prior to the first day of school, but often they are rushed and may forget what they are reading if they have to read 10-30 IEPs, plus prepare their rooms and lessons for the 1st week of school. Help your child’s teachers out by giving them something quick they can read that highlights your child’s strengths, weaknesses, preferred items and activities, and any supports you think will be helpful. Here are a few examples of handouts you can give your child’s teachers:

 

Photos Save Memories!

Don’t forget to take a photo of your child on the first day of school.  If mornings are too hectic, do it when they come home.  You want to remember your children and all their milestones they grow and they grow so fast!

Don’t worry about smiling at the camera or even looking!  If you can get a candid shot of them looking or smiling, go for it.  If not, you’ll still love to see the photo years to come.

Some of my clients have asked that we add goals like looking at the camera on cue or smiling when someone says “smile” as a goal for listener responding.  I’ve done it and for some kids this works and for some the smile looks forced.  Personally, I love more candid shots that are true to my child, but there is nothing wrong with these goals that make a difference in your family’s and child’s life!

Reinforce Yourself

If you do any of these suggestions, you are a rock star parent!  Be proud of everything you are doing for your child. Even just reading this blog! Being a special needs parent is tough, I know from personal experience.  I plan on getting my kid on the bus the first day of school, then treating myself to a favorite latte! Treat yourself! You deserve it!

How do you prepare your child for the first day of school?